An Outing Including Fish!

My personal cheerleading section, Kiri.

It’s difficult to really get into springtime mode when winter keeps trying to reprise its now-getting-old act. That first snow, back in September, was welcome, because it finally put an end to the summer fire season. In late April we would welcome something on the order of warm sunshine, and for precipitation, a nice, gentle rain would be just fine. We don’t want anymore of that fluffy white stuff for a few months.

Still, just over a week ago, I did find a day without snow to get out of town and go fishing. It was just a couple days after a snowstorm, but we take these breaks when we find them.

Some people were at home, paying the price of procrastination, and were up to their ears in receipts and other assorted slips of paper, hoping to beat the April 17 tax deadline. I procrastinated, also, but I was still done with the annual chore by the end of March.

While I call the Big Hole River my “home water,” the lower Madison River is my home away from home, when it comes to early season fishing. As the hydro dam at the head of the Beartrap Canyon controls water flows, it tends to warm up a little earlier and gets some early hatches.

While it wasn’t snowing on the day of my outing, it was cold and windy, though still tolerable—if you had enough layers on to cut the wind and stay warm.

An encouraging sign was seeing another angler catch what looked like a good-sized fish, while I was putting on my waders. I called out and said, “Nice fish!” He said it was the fourth one he’d caught, so he was pretty happy.

I walked upstream to a spot that has been good to me in recent years and started casting a beadhead nymph into the current, and was surprised to feel a fish on the end of my line within the first minute. It wasn’t a trophy by any means, but I won’t turn up my nose at a 10-inch brown trout, my first trout for 2018.

Kiri, my Labrador retriever, seemed especially pleased about that fish.

While that fish broke the ice, so to speak, we didn’t have a feeding frenzy, by any means. In fact, after what seemed a long time without any further bites, I decided to check my fly, figuring it might be dragging a twig or bit of vegetation. Instead, my fly was missing. I don’t know if I had tied a weak knot or my tippet was nicked, but the fly was gone and it partially explained why I wasn’t catching fish.

After a lunch break, I got back in the water and noted a couple rises. Taking a closer look, I could see a flotilla of little mayflies floating downstream. The cloudy conditions were favorable to a bluewing olive, or baetis, if you prefer, hatch. I was using a pheasant tail nymph and that produced another little brown trout, almost a twin of the one I’d caught earlier.

All things considered, catching two little brown trout might not be the making of a good fish story, but after a long, cold winter, I was happy.

Incidentally, that lower Madison River and the Beartrap Canyon was a busy place. Besides lots of anglers, both waders and floaters, on the water, the rocky road going up the canyon along the river was busy with hikers, runners, bikers, rock climbers, and others on their way to the wilderness area trailhead. In spite of the chilly weather, there were some campers getting ready for a weekend on the river.

If you are looking for solitude, you won’t find it on the lower Madison, and in fact, river users and Fish, Wildlife & Parks are in the process of developing a recreation management plan, similar to what we have on the Big Hole River. A first draft, however, was rejected by the head of FWP. Back to the drawing boards.

Still, the river is amazingly productive and if you need some early season action, it’s worth a jaunt in that direction.

Paul Vang’s book, “Sweeter than

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